The Intervention Process

The intervention process begins with the first phone call for help. The caller will be asked a series of questions regarding the loved who concerns them. An initial assessment will be made in order to determine necessity, urgency of the intervention and most important any safety concerns that need to be addressed.

What those desiring to participate need to understand – whether they are family, friends, or employer is that an intervention is a process and not an event.

When the concerned individual(s) decide to move forward with the intervention a more thorough assessment takes place that will help the interventionist and intervention participants to determine:

•The best model/approach for the circumstances
•Who should participate
•The timing and location of the intervention
•Appropriate treatment center/ treatment recommendations
•Treatment center admission logistics
•Family education needs/guidance for long-term recovery

An intervention does not have to be a highly charged confrontation that results in shaming the addict or alcoholic you love The intervention process I use is carried out in the spirit that motivated the family/friends to intervene in the first place-Love. A loving, compassionate, respectful intervention can be best accomplished when a family is willing to seek out the help of trained and experienced professionals.

About Alcoholism

The sustained abuse of alcohol has numerous long-term physiological effects including, but not limited to, liver damage, heart disease, brain damage, stomach and esophageal ulcers….

Types of Addictions Explained

About Alcoholism

The sustained abuse of alcohol has numerous long-term physiological effects including, but not limited to, liver damage, heart disease, brain damage...

About Prescription Drugs

Severe physiological and psychological effects may occur as a result of prescription drug abuse. These effects are extremely broad in scope and ....

About Crack Cocaine

Crack, Cocaine one of the most addictive substances abused in our society today. Crack is unique because unlike other forms of cocaine, which tend to...

About Heroin Cocaine

Heroin is a synthetic opiate, derived from morphine, but 4 times as addictive. It is illegal to manufacture, distribute or possess. Heroin is very...

About Opiates

The term opiate refers to the alkaloids (nitrogen containing organic compounds) found in opium, which is extracted from the seed pods of the opium and...

About Methamphetamine

Meth is an insidious drug. Methamphetamine acts as a dopaminergic and adrenergic reuptake inhibitor and as a sympathomimetic. Since it stimulates the...

About Alcoholism

The sustained abuse of alcohol has numerous long-term physiological effects including, but not limited to, liver damage, heart disease, brain damage, stomach and esophageal ulcers, skin problems, sexual performance problems, memory loss, vitamin deficiencies, etc. Other issues include emotional instability and irritability.

Alcohol Rehab and Detox Considerations

Many alcoholics fail to see themselves as an alcoholic, ascribing their abuse as controllable and acceptable. That perception is compounded by the fact that alcohol is not a controlled substance (illegal), and thus generally consumed. An alcoholic is often more open to the need for treatment after injuring others or damaging property, while under the influence. For the long-term abusing alcoholic, alcohol detox is often required, prior to entering the rehabilitation phase of alcohol treatment due to the medical complications that may develop as a result of immediate cessation of alcohol ingestion.

Alcohol Detox and Abuse Rehabilitation

Detoxification from alcohol is critical, prior to commencing alcohol treatment and rehabilitation. Although alcohol detox itself is not a treatment for addiction, it can help relieve withdrawal symptoms while the patient adjusts to being Alcohol free. Fortunately, there are a number of effective options for treating Alcohol addiction. Long-term alcohol abuse should not be abruptly discontinued except under the supervision of an experienced physician, who can manage the withdrawal symptoms and minimize the withdrawal period.

About Crack Cocaine

Crack, Cocaine one of the most addictive substances abused in our society today. Crack is unique because unlike other forms of cocaine, which tend to be extremely expensive, crack comes in small and low-priced packages. In the United States, crack cocaine is often sold in small, inexpensive dosage units frequently known as a “blast“ (equivalent to one hit or a dollar’s worth), “nickels”, “nickel rocks”, or “bumps“ (referring to the price of $5.00), and also “dimes”, “dime rocks”, or “boulders“ and sometimes as “twenties”, “dubs“, “doves“, “solids”, “slabs“ and “forties.” The quantity provided by such a purchase varies depending upon many factors, such as local availability. A twenty may yield a quarter gram or half gram on average, yielding 30 minutes to an hour of effect if hits are taken every few minutes. After the $20 or $40 mark, crack and powder cocaine are sold in grams or fractions of ounces.

At the intermediate level, crack cocaine is sold either by weight in ounces, referred to by terms such as “eight-ball“ (one-eighth of an ounce) or “quarter“ and “half“ respectively. In the alternate, $20 pieces of crack cocaine are aggregated in units of “fifty pack“ and “hundred pack“, referring to the number of pieces. At this level, the wholesale price is approximately half the street sale price.

About Heroin Addiction

Heroin is a synthetic opiate, derived from morphine, but 4 times as addictive. It is illegal to manufacture, distribute or possess. Heroin is very addictive and habit forming, as frequent repeated intake causes a rapid development of tolerance. It is a Schedule I narcotic drug. Heroin produces an intense ‘euphoria,’ upon intake, however, it disappears with increasing tolerance. Although the chemical structure is similar to morphine, indeed Heroin metabolizes into Morphine in the brain, and other opioids, many Heroin users claim somewhat different perceived effects, thus making it a more popular recreational drug. Heroin is taken orally, nasally, by smoking, intravenously and through other less common methods.

Side Effects Of Heroin

Severe physiological side effects include respiratory arrest, seizure, spontaneous abortion for pregnant women, coma and death. Less severe side effects include lowered heart rate, shallow respiration, nausea, vomiting, constipation, urinary retention, dry mouth, and pupil constriction, itching, and rash. Psychological side effects include confusion, euphoria, somnolence, and addiction.

Withdrawal

Withdrawal symptoms include sweating, malaise, anxiety, depression, insomnia, vomiting diarrhea, goose bumps, ‘itchy blood,’ muscle spasms. Heroin users who attempt detoxification ‘cold turkey’ (without medication or preparation) are much more likely to experience these negative withdrawal symptoms in a much more pronounced manner. See below for further withdrawal information.

Heroin Detox and Abuse Rehabilitation

Detoxification from Heroin is critical, prior to commencing rehabilitation. Although detoxification itself is not a treatment for addiction, it can help relieve withdrawal symptoms while the patient adjusts to being Heroin free. Fortunately, there are a number of effective options for treating Heroin addiction. Long-term Heroin use should not be abruptly discontinued except under the supervision of an experienced physician, who can manage the withdrawal symptoms and minimize the withdrawal period.

About Meth Addiction

Methamphetamine

Meth is an insidious drug. Methamphetamine acts as a dopaminergic and adrenergic reuptake inhibitor and as a sympathomimetic. Since it stimulates the mesolimbic reward pathway, causing euphoria and excitement, it is prone to abuse and addiction. Methamphetamine rapidly enters the brain and triggers a cascading release of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin. Users may become obsessed or perform

Percentage of US college students who have illicitly used methamphetamine in their lifetime.

Percentage of US college students who have illicitly used methamphetamine in their lifetime.

repetitive tasks such as cleaning, hand-washing, or assembling and disassembling objects. Withdrawal is characterized by excessive sleeping, eating and depression-like symptoms, often accompanied by anxiety and drug-craving. Users of methamphetamine often take one or more benzodiazepines as a means of “coming down”.

Percentage of US college students who have illicitly used methamphetamine in their lifetime.

Percentage of US college students who have illicitly used methamphetamine in their lifetime.

Methamphetamine is classified as a Schedule II substance by the Drug Enforcement Administration under the Convention on Psychotropic Substances. It is available by prescription under the trade name Desoxyn, manufactured by Ovation Pharma. While there is technically no difference between the laws regarding methamphetamine and other controlled stimulants, most medical professionals are averse to prescribing it due to its notoriety.

Illicit methamphetamine has become a major focus of the ‘war on drugs’ in the United States in recent years. In addition to federal laws, some states have placed additional restrictions on the sale of precursor chemicals commonly used to synthesize methamphetamine, particularly pseudoephedrine, a common over-the-counter decongestant. In 2005, the DEA seized 2,148.6kg of methamphetamine. In 2005, the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act of 2005 was passed as part of the USA PATRIOT Act, putting restrictions on the sale of methamphetamine precursors.

On November 7, 2006, the US Department of Justice declared that November 30, 2006 be Methamphetamine Awareness Day.

DEA El Paso Intelligence Center EPIC data is showing a distinct downward trend in the seizure of clandestine drug labs for the illicit manufacture of methampetamine from a high of 17,356 in 2003. Lab seizure data for the United States is available from EPIC beginning in 1999 when 7,438 labs were reported to have been seized during that calendar year.

Methamphetamine is most structurally similar to methcathinone and amphetamine. When illicSpun, a movie about methamphetamine addicts.itly produced, it is commonly made by the reduction of ephedrine or pseudoephedrine. Most of the necessary chemicals are readily available in household products or over-the-counter cold or allergy medicines. Synthesis is relatively simple, but entails risk with flammable and corrosive chemicals, particularly the solvents used in extraction and purification. Clandestine production is therefore often discovered by fires and explosions caused by the improper handling of volatile or flammable solvents.

Most methods of illicit production involve hydrogenation of the hydroxyl group on the ephedrine or pseudoephedrine molecule. The most common method for small-scale methamphetamine labs in the United States is primarily called the “Red, White, and Blue Process”, which involves red phosphorus, pseudoephedrine or ephedrine(white), and blue iodine, from which hydroiodic acid is formed.

This is a fairly dangerous process for amateur chemists, because phosphine gas, a side-product from phosphorus production, is extremely toxic to inhale. An increasingly common method uses the process of Birch reduction, in which metallic lithium (commonly extracted from rechargeable batteries) is substituted for metallic sodium, to circumvent the difficulty of procuring metallic sodium.

 About Opiates

The term opiate refers to the alkaloids (nitrogen containing organic compounds) found in opium, which is extracted from the seed pods of the opium poppy plant.Opiate Addiction Pills

Traditionally and colloquially, the term opiate referred to the derivatives of morphine. However, the broader term ‘opioid’ is the more appropriate term that encompasses all drugs, both natural and synthetic, with opium or morphine-like pharmacological action.

The primary opiates derived from opium are morphine, codeine and thebaine. These are narcotics, used for their analgesic (pain relieving) properties. Opiates act as CNS (Central Nervous System) depressants.

Addiction

Prolonged use of any opiates eventually changes the brain in fundamental and lasting ways, which explains why addicts cannot simply quit without professional help. This is why treatment is essential. Drugs of abuse take over the brain’s normal pleasure and motivational systems, advancing the drug use to the highest priority in the individual’s motivational hierarchy, thus overriding all other motivations and drives. These brain changes are responsible for the compulsion to seek/use drugs, which is defined as addiction.

About Prescription Drug Addiction

Severe physiological and psychological effects may occur as a result of prescription drug abuse. These effects are extremely broad in scope and intensity, some of which can result in death. Many severe physiological symptoms of prescription drug abuse include respiratory depression/arrest, loss of consciousness, coma and even death. Less severe side effects include lowered heart rate, shallow respiration, nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, and pupil constriction, itching, and rash, among many others.

Psychological effects include impaired judgment, confusion, euphoria, mood disorders and somnolence.

Prescription drug detox is critical, prior to commencing rehabilitation. Although detoxification itself is not a treatment for addiction and abuse, it can help relieve withdrawal symptoms while the patient adjusts to being prescription drug free. Fortunately, there are a number of effective options for treating prescription addiction. Long-term substance abuse should not be abruptly discontinued except under the supervision of an experienced physician, who can manage the withdrawal symptoms and minimize the withdrawal period.

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